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Experience Levels for Software Engineer Skills: Worknector’s Approach

When crafting your profile on the Worknector platform, you’ll be asked to specify your experience level. You are of course free to set this based on your subjective viewpoint, but in order for us to provide you with the best possible match, we need an objective estimation.

For this purpose, we have developed the Fighter Range. The following presents detailed descriptions of what is considered to come under each level. We encourage talents to use it so that we can make their experience on the platform more efficient.

How do we estimate it?

For each Skill/Tech, we have 7 levels on the platform:

1. Beginner (Trainee)

2. Junior

3. Junior+

4. Middle

5. Middle+

6. Senior

7. Expert

What comes under each level?

1) Beginner

Experience Levels for Software Engineer Skills: Worknector's Approach
  • Only some theoretical knowledge (with relevant education);
  • No real work experience or practice with the Skill/Tech;

Working experience with that Skill/Tech: none

2) Junior

Experience Levels for Software Engineer Skills: Worknector's Approach
  • Was involved in several projects;
  • Had some independent practical experience, although only under close supervision;
  • Completely unable to use the Skill/Tech without documentation/instructions;

Working experience with that Skill/Tech: up to 2 years

3) Junior+ (Threshold level)

Experience Levels for Software Engineer Skills: Worknector's Approach
  • Can use the Skill/Tech more freely, but still needs some supervision
  • Has to refer to documentation/instructions on an almost daily basis;

Working experience with that Skill/Tech: 2-3 years

4) Middle

Experience Levels for Software Engineer Skills: Worknector's Approach
  • When assigned relatively routine tasks, can use the Skill/Tech almost independently or with low-level supervision

Working experience with that Skill/Tech: 3-4 years

5) Middle+ (Threshold level)

Experience Levels for Software Engineer Skills: Worknector's Approach
  • More independent use on a daily basis (compared to the previous level);
  • Can start to supervise some junior professionals;

Working experience with that Skill/Tech: 4-5 years

6) Senior

Experience Levels for Software Engineer Skills: Worknector's Approach
  • 100% independent use on a daily basis;
  • Deeply specialized knowledge;
  • Can use the skill intuitively;
  • Can freely mentor other people;

Working experience with that Skill/Tech: 6-10 years*

*But might stay as a Senior even after 10 years. It depends on the attitude and career goals.

7) Expert

Experience Levels for Software Engineer Skills: Worknector's Approach
  • A guru who knows virtually everything about the Skill/Tech (“as a creator of a technology”);
  • Can “teach” and surprise even Senior peers, e.g. at a conference;

Working experience with that Skill/Tech: 10+ years

Of course, the timeframe for technology experience is very subjective, e.g. one person can stay as a Junior for 3 years while another talent could be there for just 1-2 years.

On the other hand, a Senior C++ Developer may become a Middle in JS after just a year of JS experience (a solid background in C++ is a good foundation for a new tech stack).

Also, the number of real projects and their duration/complexity in which you used this particular technology or skill can serve as good criteria to define the actual working experience.

But, in any case, the Fighter Range level you choose must be consistent with the desired role level and its type, i.e. when applying for a Junior role, you shouldn’t have the Middle level for all the technologies or skills.

Bottom line: When self-assessing your own knowledge and skills, do your best to be objective and realistic. As mentioned above, this will help us to provide you with the best match and will prevent any disappointment, both for you and the potential employer. Moreover, you’ll be able to demonstrate to the employer that your skills are strong enough and that you are really confident in what you’re doing.